Are you a Traditionalist?

Posted on October 19, 2009
Filed Under book review, Culture, Definitions & Labels, identity, Magic, mystical journeys, occult culture, Taylor Ellwood, time magic | 2 Comments

A reader asked me yesterday, after I posted my review of Evola’s book on Buddhism, if I agreed with Evola’s  traditionalist views in other areas, because I liked Evola’s work. When I posted the review to Amazon, I’d noticed traditionalism come up as a possible tag, first time I ever came across the word actually. Let me just say that assuming I’m anything based on what I read is at best an erroneous assumption.

It’s true I like Julius Evola’s writing. And if we were to research Julius the person, we would find out he was a fascist and I guess a traditionalist as well (maybe they are even one and the same!). But I’m not interested in Evola’s political beliefs and don’t find them relevant to my practice. Nor, really, am I concerned with labeling his spiritual practices or my own as traditionalist.

In fact, I’m not really interesting in trying to label my own practices either. The most I’ve ever done is to label myself as an experimental magician, an even that label is one I rely on less these days. What’s really important afterall is not the label, but rather what one is actually doing.

So for me, Evola’s writing, which I like because he’s a good scholar and offers some intriguing perspectives on what he writes about, whether it’s Buddhism or Tantra, or Hermeticism, or an article on time magic, is important because I find it relevant to my spiritual practice. Frex, the book on Buddhism offered some useful insights into early Buddhist texts and practices, and proved helpful in my emptiness working.

But even though I like his works, it shouldn’t be assumed that I’m a traditionalist or anything else that Evola was. I am, after all, not Julius Evola (last I checked). Nor because I’ve read Edward Hall and liked his work, should it be assumed I hold to his political beliefs or his approach to anthropology or anything else. Liking someone’s writing doesn’t mean you agree with all of it or that you hold the same beliefs as someone.

But really what I’m saying is this: Labels are at best an illusion crafted to provide us and others the security (a false one) of being able to say this person is this or that. But what if I’m not?

I read what I read because I find it important to cultivate an awareness of a wide variety of perspectives and beliefs so that I can see how those perspectives inform my spiritual and indeed, overall life. So am I a traditionalist? Likely not.

But I am me…and I do enjoy learning and applying what I learn toward living a better life. I hope you do as well.

Review of The Silent Language by Edward T. Hall

In this book, Hall explores the intricacies of time and space from a cultural studies perspective. Although this book is a bit dated, the information is still very relevant, and what Hell offers is an examination of how much our perception of time influences our cultural and everyday interactions. For example, learning just how tightly time is wound for Americans as opposed to other cultures is quite insightful to the workaholicism that pervades American culture. Hall touches on some aspects of space as well, though you’ll find more of his thoughts on it, in the hidden dimension. What I most enjoyed about this book is an exploration of time from a social science perspective as opposed to a hard science perspective.  I definitely recommend it to anyone interested in understanding concepts of space and time.

5 out of 5 stars

Comments

2 comments
Lupa
Lupa

Whee, assumption of guilt by association! Nice rebuttal here.

Lupa
Lupa

Whee, assumption of guilt by association! Nice rebuttal here.