Further thoughts on being out of the closet

Posted on March 1, 2012
Filed Under Culture, occult culture | 8 Comments

Last week I wrote about why its important to be out of the closet. Since writing it, I’ve reflected further on the importance on being out of the closet, as have others. In this blog post that the author wrote in response to mine. As he notes there is a risk run with being out of the closet. Being out of the closet about your beliefs, sexuality, or whatever else can have negative consequences, and although it’d be nice to believe that the world is a tolerant place, the truth is that it isn’t always a nice place. There will always be some people who will say, in ignorance and stupidity, that some people should stay in the closet. They make statements like that because they occupy a position of privilege. They’ve never had to face persecution for their beliefs or other choices. They are part of a majority, and they smugly pass judgement on issues they don’t really understand.

As the author of the other blog entry notes, its important to stand up and be counted especially when you don’t fit into the dominant culture. It’s a social responsibility and a method of social transformation that pushes for the world to be a more tolerant, and easier place to live in. When you don’t stand up, you essentially are condoning the way things are, and the intolerance and prejudice that comes with it. And it’s not easy to stand up, to be out of the closet, but its importance because it raises awareness and it calls on us to be excellent to each other. It calls on us to be better to each other, to aspire for a more tolerant world that accepts people of different walks of life, with the understanding that while you might not make those particular choices, each person has a right to make the life choices s/he has made and be able to live those choices without fear of being persecuted for them.

Yesterday, I came across an entry that had been written in May of 2011 about the fact that entries about Pagan authors and pagan culture are deleted fairly frequently on wikipedia because not enough “reliable” resources have been written about the topic. The author of that post notes ” Not enough sources they consider ‘reliable’ have written about Paganistan, which is short hand for saying the mainstream press hasn’t written much about us and the other sources listed aren’t reliable for one reason or another” Now it could be argued that much ado is being made about very little, but I’d argue that if anything when a subculture tries to carve out its own space in dominant culture and in media outlets of dominant culture there is always some kind of push back. Cara, the author of the second entry I linked to notes:

One of the reasons Pagan articles get put onto the fast track to deletion is that they lack sources Wikipedia considers reliable, which then makes the entire topic ‘not worthy of note.’  After all, if it was worth noting, people would write about it, right?

On the face of it, there’s nothing wrong with this policy as it helps ensure that the articles and sources are solid.  When this policy is put into practice with under-reported minority groups such as modern Pagans, that’s where the unintentional discrimination happens.

That unintentional, and in some cases, intentional discrimination is why its important to come out of the closet and stay out. Change doesn’t occur when people hide for fear of persecution or discrimination.

In my last post on this topic I mentioned I’d been outed by my friend’s family to my mom when I was 18. She didn’t handle it well. She told me I had to either move out or burn my books. I opted at the time to burn my books (only the ones I’d already read). I did it because I didn’t have a job, I was in high school and I had half a tank of gas in my car. I didn’t have a lot of options open to me, but it was a hard experience to realize I had to burn my books because my mom’s Christian fundamentalism wouldn’t tolerate my choice to believe in magic. I promised myself, after that experience, that I wouldn’t hide. And later that year, when the step-father of the aforementioned friend teamed up with the father of that friend to call me on the phone and threaten to kill me for my beliefs, I didn’t back down. I called the police and I let them know that their attempts to attack me weren’t going to work. They backed down, probably because both of them were drunk and acting out their prejudice. But I learned a valuable lesson from it. You stand up and you be proud and you don’t let ignorant idiots like that think they can get away with pulling stupid shit.

Even to this day I can’t talk with my mom about my books or my beliefs, and even the rest of my family prefers to avoid talking about it. They just want this partial experience of me, of who I am, instead of really getting to know the real me. It’s their choice, and their loss, because I can’t not be me. I can’t just hide in the closet because it makes someone else’s life a bit more convenient. I won’t inflict my choices on someone else, but I don’t hide who I am to just make someone else happier. That’s not how acceptance is won and when you are in a minority keeping silent to curry the favor of the majority doesn’t get you very far. It just keeps you in a place that’s convenient for them. So I’m out of the closet and to anyone who thinks I should be in a closet, all I really have to say is “Must be nice to be a bigot.”

Edit: Another post can be found here about an issue occurring in South Carolina which highlights discrimination against Pagans in a school setting.

 

 

 

Comments

6 comments
sotu333
sotu333

Ran into the same 'wiki' thing concerning a group who wanted a small definition/clarification added to the main page concerning "jedi" and "jedi realists" (folks who are trying to be 'Jedi like' in everyday living).  Seems wiki's idea of what is worth keeping depends on how many news articles you might have had 'run' on your group / topic or as noted, how many 'real' books you have had published or had mention of the group/concept specifically.     Other odd thing I found out was, the original wiki entry person (jedi as a religion) seemed to have a large part in the veto power over any further 'defining' of what went on the page... so, bias from the get go in some cases.

 

Wiki is handy but, still not considered a reliable source by any college.  Especially since anyone at any time can go in and change the material -- which might be totally false but, until it's 'disputed'; can stay onsite for months or years... and takes forever to get wiki to admit is 'wrong and must be fixed'.  Case in point are many personal biographies over the years.

Julian Vayne
Julian Vayne

Thanks for this article Taylor and for the pointer to the blog detailing the deletion of Pagan articles on Wikipedia. As I wrote on the PNC blog:

 

"Interesting to see this article. Some years ago there was an entry about me in wikipedia (which I didn't create) which was then deleted. I looked briefly at the discussion as to why and it did seem to be to do with whether I was an author that sold sufficient books to qualify as worthy of a mention. So it's interesting to see how the wiki 'standards' are applied more generally. David's comment above <he's an ex editor and claims that much 'alterntive' belief related material gets deleted> is frankly disturbing."

 

Methinks we need to get the Gods of Wiki to look into this matter...

 

best wishes

 

Julian Vayne

DarkArckana
DarkArckana

Agreed entirely. But there's a difference between being  in the closet and simply making preparations behind a curtain. Think of how the fundamentalist movement started in the 70's.

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