Melatonin and Tryptophan

Posted on September 7, 2010
Filed Under Body, book review, Neurotransmitters, Taylor Ellwood | Leave a Comment

Melatonin always appears as a dark skinned woman. she’s the polar opposite of serotonin, but also¬† does similar activities in terms of balancing the neurochemistry of the body as well as a person’s emotional moods. She’s also helpful in cases of insomnia.

She and serotonin can be worked with simultaneously in order to help with situations such as insomnia, where there might be too much serotonin and not enough melatonin or in cases of waking up, where serotonin can be upped while melatonin is decreased.

Tryptophan appears to me as a pregnant sleeping Empress. She aids in Digestion and is consequently a force for change in neurochemistry. People may wish to work with her to get help with digestion issues or sleep issues.

Book Review: The Sorcerer’s Secrets by Jason Miller

In this book, the author presents practical ideas and strategies for people who are just starting out in their magical practice. This isn’t a 101 book, but its safe to say it’s a 102 book that also offers some insights to magicians with more experience. What I appreciate the most is that the author takes the time to focus on considerations such as finances and explains that while magic can help, it’s also important to learn practical mundane skills.

I also appreciate the author’s choice to draw on a wide variety of sources that fall outside the traditional bibliography usually found in books. The author illustrates the importance of developing a well-rounded strategy by exposing readers to alternative sources.

There are two reasons this book gets a four instead of a five, however. One reason is because the author doesn’t address the value of doing internal work as a practical and strategic solution. while knowing how to do practical magic to solve a problem is important, being able to identify your participation in the problem and making changes is even more important, and more practical. The other reason is that while the author does draw on non-traditional sources, he doesn’t address the topic of innovation and how it can be used to develop practical magic.

All that said, this is an excellent book to read, and one I’d recommend to someone just starting out.

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