On the value of Inner Alchemy

Posted on September 7, 2008
Filed Under Buddhism, Culture, identity, meditation, mystical journeys, Occult, Taoism, Taylor Ellwood | Leave a Comment

I’m copy editing a book for Immanion Press called Whiskey, Tango, Foxtrot: A Troubleshooter’s Guide to Magic by A’Miketh, and I’m really impressed by what I’m reading, because this guy has managed to explain some complex concepts in fairly approachable language, and more importantly he’s cleared stated the value and need for doing external work before getting into all of the flashy external magical work. And I have a lot of respect for that.

I was chatting with Bill Whitcomb earlier tonight about how change occurs in society, and we both agreed that change takes a long time to occur when it’s done right, because the best way that change occurs is through changing the internal reality of yourself and modeling that change to others. It’s not nearly as dramatic or active as trying to protest political rallies or trying to throw a revolution because you dislike what other people are doing. It’s a much slower form or change…it takes time and some effort to create change in yourself that brings you to healthier patterns of behavior and communication.

But I would take that kind of change over the change of a revolution, because a revolution inevitably only replaces the previous oppressors with the people revolting against them. That is to say in a revolution the only thing that changes are the people in charge. What doesn’t change is how those people treat other people, because for a revolution to usually be successful, it is violent…and that same violence twists the people who beget it, so that they become what they hate, because having overthrown a previous government, they quickly begin to fear that the same will happen to them. The French revolution and the Bolshevik revolution and revolutions in China (both in the early and mid twentieth century), and to a lesser extent the American revolution are good examples of this process, where change is promised and a government is overthrown and ultimately what replaces it is more of the oppression that the revolutionaries claimed they fought against. This incidentally is one of the reasons I’m skeptical about the so-called good intentions of the activists…I see them as just another form of political extremism and should that extremism replace what we currently have, I don’t believe it will be any better than what it replaces.

I favor instead a revolution that comes from within a person…a fervent desire to change the self, to recognize that to change the world around us, we must first be willing to take responsibility for our own actions and thoughts. Instead of blaming others for the woes of the worlds, we should take responsibility for ourselves and what we can change…our attitudes about others, our actions toward the environment we live in and do it in a manner where we model how we want the world to change, but without trying to force that change down everyone’s throat. I imagine that may sound idealistic, but in copy-editing this book and reading this person’s thoughts on how to create a system of mindful awareness and internal change mechanisms in western practices of occultism, I see more than idealism…I see a methodology and practice that can make it happen, but ultimately requires a voluntary to make it occur. I turned to Taoist and Buddhist breathing and meditation techniques to develop a system for internal work that was also mixed with Western techniques for pathworking, but in reading some of Dunlap’s ideas, I also see some hope for Western occultism developing some of those same internal practices without having to borrow as much from Eastern practices.

It seems to me that when a culture or society doesn’t have a system of some sorts for developing reflective and consciousness awareness of emotions and reactions and triggers, it is very hard for that society to change. And really, for this kind of internal work to really bear results, you need everyone in society doing the work…not just some monks in a mountain hideaway. This is why I hope such practices will continue to become more prevalent in this culture…so that people can really be aware of what sets them off and work on deprogramming the bad triggers, while also figuring out who they really want to be and how they want to manifest that to each other and the world at large. I think if such practices were more prevalent there would be much less violence, much more cooperation, and also much more of a sense of connection to and with each other as well as an awareness of the responsibility we have to each other, to ourselves and to the environment we live in, aka, to the entirety of this Earth and universe.

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