Results and their role in the magical process

Posted on January 17, 2011
Filed Under book review, Magic | Leave a Comment

We always get results. We don’t always get the results we want. In magic, we are told not to lust for results, but conversely we look to results to prove that magic is effective, and that our magical process works. The reason we are told not to lust for results is because if we do, the obsession we put toward that desired result removes the obtainment of it from us. And I think there’s some truth to that reason. I’ve known people who’ve become obsessive and let that obsession consume them, which has stopped them from recognizing opportunities that were coming their way.

At the same time, you need to know what result you want to achieve in order to create a magical process that will (ideally) get you that result. It is also helpful to be as specific as possible in defining and describing the result. A vague description of a desired result isn’t very helpful or useful. For example, if your result is: “I want a job”, that’s fairly vague. On the other hand if you state: “I want a teaching position, where I make at least 60,000 a year and have opportunities to advance in my school district.”, then you have a more specific result that you are aiming for.

Developing a specific result allows you to develop a specific magical process to help you achieve that result. Here are some questions to keep in mind as you define your result:

1. What is the result I want?

2. What are additional details I can include to make the result more specific? Additional details should include anything that you would consider important or helpful.

3. Why do I want this result? How will it benefit my life to achieve this result?

4. Is there any part of this desired result that I don’t agree with or feel resistant toward? If there is part of me that feels resistant to it, why do I feel that way?

5. How will I feel once the result is achieved? What will I do with the result?

All of these questions can help you not only develop a specific result, but also determine if it’s a result that you can achieve. If you discover that there is resistance toward the result, it’s a good idea to spend some time looking at the reasons for that resistance, to determine if the result is something you really want.

Would you include any other questions? If so what would you include?

 

 

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