Revisiting well worn trails

Posted on May 8, 2008
Filed Under Buddhism, hermeticism, Magic, meditation, mystical journeys, Occult | 8 Comments

I’m starting to read Introduction to Magic: Rituals and Practical Techniques for the Magus by Julius Evola and the UR group. It’s my first time reading this book, but not my first time reading Evola’s work. I first encountered Evola’s work when I read his book on Tantra: The Yoga of Power. I find Evola’s writing to be intriguing, if hard to read, which is to be expected given that the original language was Italian (and thus translated into English) and it was written in the Early Twentieth century. I find it’s important to acknowledge those two points, because I’m not just reading a work on magic from a different culture, but also from a different time period, and in my experience a time period has it’s own culture as well, which informs the context of what is being read or worked with.

I think Julius Evola is one of those magicians who often is not known about or read by many contemporary occultists, likely because many people just don’t know what to read from the early to mid twentieth century beyond the usual Golden Dawn or Crowley material. So you might wonder where the title revisiting well worn trails comes from and that is due to the content of the book, which is focused on Hermeticism and western ceremonial magic.  For me, while reading this book will definitely get me in touch with some new ideas or perspectives, it’s also revisiting trails I’ve been on before and will walk on again.

Another work I’m reading is The places that scare you by Pema Chodron, which is again a revisiting of a Buddhist perspective to a lot of the internal work I’m currently doing for myself. I have no doubt that the internal work will intersect with the work I do in the book by Evola. As above so below, as within, so without.

It’s a continuing journey on well-worn trails.

Comments

0 comments