Some thoughts on genetic memory

Posted on November 27, 2009
Filed Under Experiments, Magic, Taylor Ellwood | 1 Comment

I’ve been playing Assassin’s Creed 2 lately, and one of the elements of the game is the ability of the main character to access his ancestor’s genetic memories in order to learn skills from them. I think it’s an interesting idea. I don’t know how viable it is, if only because the genetic code will be different, but you’re not really becoming the person, so much as you’re accessing the genetic information that the person contributed, and within that information could perhaps be also all the memories of that person. Is it far-fetched? Maybe, but the idea is interesting, and could be worth exploring. If a person is able to access the memories of ancestors and learn skills from said ancestors, it could be an interesting exploration of memory and space/time magic. So I might experiment with it.

I get a lot of my ideas about magic from unconventional sources, such as video games, but I find that being open to those ideas has really helped me out both in terms of magical experimentation and also for writing purposes. And unconventional ideas can lead to innovation in magical practice, which is essential for progress. I don’t know if this idea will bear fruit. Some of my ideas don’t, but its worth trying out and I have some idea of how I’ll implement it. I’m thinking the mind machine will be very helpful as an interface of sorts. More later, once I’ve tried it.

Comments

1 comments
bluecapucian
bluecapucian

I have always learned from my ancestors, not so much accessing their memories as listening to their voices. Those who came before us are only physically gone their energy remains. I request their advice whenever I am exploring a new idea in magic or my personal life. When learning from the ancestors one must always take into account the times they lived in. Their world views are often much simpler and direct than modern times. I have very rarely actually found it necessary to act against others. In harsher times direct action against others before they acted against you was the rule instead of the rarity.