Why Immanion Press is so Important to me

Posted on March 8, 2013
Filed Under Books, Immanion Press, Magic, pop culture, Taylor Ellwood | 6 Comments

Immanion Press

I don’t write much about the work I do with Immanion Press on this blog. Indeed, as far as many of you know, I’m just one of its authors. But the truth is I’m not just an author of Immanion Press. I’m also the Managing Non-Fiction editor of Immanion Press. (Cue in the jokes about being a Hair club for men member). For me, Immanion Press is one of the vehicles by which I express my passion for writing and publishing and magic in the world.

My service to Immanion Press is one of the ways I give back to the magical community and is also an offering to the magic itself. I am not paid a salary at Immanion Press. I get a small royalty for books I edit, but I don’t get paid for the layout I do, or a lot of the other work I do and I am fine with that. My service to Immanion is a dedication of love to occult writing, occult authors, and to the magic itself. It is done because I want to publish books that I know will likely not see the light of day because other publishers are afraid to touch the books. It is done because I want to empower authors who have had bad experiences with other publishers, and show them that someone has their back. Indeed as I write this I reflect on an email a prospective author sent me on Thursday, telling me how validated she feels to have a publisher interested in her work who will respect her voice, who will edit the book, but not to commoditize it for the mass market. I like hearing that because to me a publisher has two clients: The Authors and the Readers. Too often, imo, most publishers focus on the latter and forget or neglect the former.

Way back in 2003, I had written Pop Culture Magick. I shopped the book to Weiser, New Falcon, and a couple other publishers. In some cases I didn’t hear back from the publishers and in other cases, I got a rejection letter. I was told that my book was too niche and controversial. I was told that I shouldn’t try to publish it because it wouldn’t sell. So during a trip to England, I talked with Storm Constantine, owner of Immanion Press, and to this day a good friend of mine. I showed her my book and even though Immanion Press had originally been intended for Science Fiction and Fantasy books, she saw the potential in my book and agreed to publish it. In 2004, Pop Culture Magick was published and thus we started the non-fiction line of Immanion Press. It strikes me as ironic that NOW bigger publishers want to publish books on pop culture magic. I guess it’s no longer so controversial, but in 2003, a decade ago, no one would touch my book. I doubt I’ll ever really get the recognition I think is deserved for paving the way, but I know I paved the way. Not just with my books either, but with other books by other authors as well. Of course, I didn’t do it alone.

I had help over the years from the authors, from Storm, from Kat, and from other people and I am thankful to all of them to this day, because the nonfiction line for Immanion Press couldn’t be what it is without the authors, editors, and volunteers who’ve offered time, blood, and sweat to make things happen. Immanion Press has always been a team effort, and so really it’s that all of us paved the way to one extent or another.

A couple of months after Pop Culture Magic was published, Nick Farrell emailed me and asked if Immanion Press would consider publishing his book Gathering the Magic. It’s a book about magical group dynamics and big surprise, none of the bigger publishers wanted to publish it. So I asked Storm about it, and Immanion Press took it on. I was still just an author then, but as more authors found out about us, and discovered that we wanted to publish intermediate to advanced books on magic that were for niche markets and that no book was too controversial for us, Storm asked me if I would be willing to be the managing non-fiction editor. She respected my expertise as an occultist, and the way that I knew the market. I said yes and I began what has been and continues to be one of the most important callings of my life: I publish the books other publishers won’t touch because I know there is a market and that those publishers are wrong. They don’t get it…how can they, when what they are focused on is really the bottom line? And I get why they are…and they have a place, and the books they publish have a place, but even so, on a certain level they just don’t get it, and they never will. They aren’t publishing for the same reason and what they publish is for a larger market. They aren’t going to publish the controversial books, the risky books because they don’t want to alienate that larger market. But the truth is that anything that is published is bound to offend someone. It’s not always about hitting the largest market possible. It’s about reaching the right market…the right people and meeting their needs even if it isn’t an automatic hit. It’s about knowing the market, knowing the people, knowing what they want…and knowing that giving it to them does involve some risk, because you can’t please everyone…and maybe you shouldn’t.

Working at Immanion Press hasn’t always been easy. At one point I came very close to leaving, burned out, and fed up with how taken for granted I felt by everyone involved. And being a strong personality, I know I am not always easy to work with and that I’ve made a few mistakes along the way. But overall, I love the work I do at Immanion Press and over time the process has gotten easier. What people forget sometimes is that Immanion Press is a small press. We don’t have a paid staff of editors, publicists, marketers, etc. We run on a tight budget and the people who work for us get paid in royalties. And yet they do it anyway, which I am so thankful for…because they believe in the vision of Immanion Press. They believe that what we are doing is important enough to support it. And despite not having what traditional publishers have, we make it work and we find ways to help our authors out. It’s not a perfect system, far from it, and sometimes it doesn’t work out as well as it could. But we make it work anyway.

And I am proud of our authors and books. I am proud that I’ve played a role, however small it is, in helping authors launch their writing career and when I see that one of my authors got a book published by another publisher I feel good about it, because I know that getting published by us helped with that. We publish the controversial books, and we also bring books back into print and what we have available is awesome. We’ve published books on the subjects that the other publishers won’t touch and we’ve played a role in getting conversations to happen. We’ve also told the authors that we want them to write in their voices and that we won’t sanitize those voices. At the same time, we’ve insisted on academic standards of in-text citation and quotations, which readers tell me they love because they see it so rarely in the majority of books published on magic and paganism.

At this last Pantheacon, two of my authors, Tony Mierzwicki and Crystal Blanton, told me in their respective ways how much they liked working with Immanion Press. Tony told me how he’d shopped his book Graeco-Egyptian Magic everywhere and was about to self-publish it when he remembered meeting me and decided to see if we’d publish his book. We said yes and he told me how getting his book published opened doors for him. He told me how much he appreciated a free marketing seminar I gave to the authors (and inspired me to start it up again for my authors). And I know that even if he never publishes another book with us, we played a role in his life and in his writing that he’ll always remember. And that touched me so profoundly and I was so grateful for his appreciation and recognition of Immanion Press and my role in all of it.

And at one point I was talking with Crystal and she abruptly stopped me and said, with much emotion, “Thank you” several times. And later she told me how much she appreciated my vision for Immanion and she said that she didn’t think I knew what an impact I had on her community because of how I’d supported her as an author and as an editor of The Shades of Faith Anthology we published. And she’s right I didn’t know it, but that weekend gave me a glimpse…and later she acknowledged at a panel my role in the anthology and how I’d recognized I wasn’t the right person to edit that anthology, and that I knew I needed to find someone who could do it justice. I was so touched by what she said, so honored that she felt I had contributed to her vision and work.

And I’ve had other authors on occasions tell me similar things and I have always felt touched. To me that is the biggest payoff. I have helped authors reach their audience. I have respected their voices, their culture, their audience…I have done my job as a publisher and an editor and as a magician…I have believed in them and provided a platform to help them reach others who can believe in them as well.

And I’ve continued to write my books and place them with Immanion. I’ll admit I do find it frustrating when I go to Powells books and don’t see my books on the shelves or the Barnes and Nobles because we use print on demand and because we don’t take returns. Yet that frustration pales to the joy I feel writing my books my way…knowing my voice will be respected, knowing that the cover of the book will be the cover I pick. And I know I’m reaching my audience. I’m reaching the people who need my work and that is what is really important.

I’m writing a book on Wealth Magic and I flirted with the idea of letting another publisher publish one of my books. I even sent a proposal in and then…I went to a panel held by the publisher and in that panel I heard everything that was an antithesis of my approach to publishing. They wanted trendy, marketable ideas. They wanted books that had cute titles and approached magic in a hip marketable manner that would hit the largest market possible. I left feeling sick to my stomach and I knew that none of my occult books will likely ever be published by a larger publisher. I simply can’t imagine emasculating my vision and my words in that way just to make a buck. And I don’t feel they will really get my vision or my approach or understand that I know the market better than they may know it. I know I’ll write non-occult books (I’m starting one as soon as I finish the wealth magic book) and those books will go to more mainstream publishers, but my spiritual work, the work that touches the heart of the universe and speaks the language of magic…that work needs to be the way it is…not written for a general audience…not written to make a buck, but written to speak to the people who need it…written in my voice, written the way I want it to be written. And yes it means my books will always be with a small publisher. It means that I won’t get some of the advantages that some of my other occult authors have. And I can live with that…because even though its a harder road to walk and there is more work on my end as an author, I’ve already been doing it for ten years, and I like how I feel about myself as a writer and as a magician. I don’t say that to pass judgments on other authors. I recognize that many of the other occult authors have had awesome relationships with the publishers they’ve worked with. I just feel that for me I know where the home of my occult books are…and hopefully always will be. And that’s Immanion Press. My press…my publisher and one of my loves. I love Immanion Press. I love what we stand for and I love that I serve the magic with the work I do for the press. That is more important than anything else. I serve the magic.

Comments

6 comments
aartiana
aartiana

Taylor, I had followed your authoring career for a long while now, and I am absolutely thrilled with your involvement with Immanion Press!  It is so true that so many books that Immanion publishes actually need to exist in the world.  I thoroughly agree that it is about finding the right reader, and in this case, that right reader is usually ready to move onward and upward from all the beginner stuff out there.  It can be so difficult to find advanced material in these subject areas.  Not only that, I like how alternative approaches are not only accepted, they are encouraged!  Thank you for all you do Taylor and Storm! :-)

Leni
Leni

I was thinking about Immanion and its role in so many of our lives, while I was at pantheacon. I know i have bot said "thank you" nearly enough for all you have done to bring so many voices, incluing mine, out into the world. Thank you so much for all you've done!

Lupa
Lupa

Just wanted to take the opportunity to say thank you for giving me that start so many years ago; I'm glad that I've been able to give some of my best writing to IP/MB. It's been an honor working with you on this.

Magicexperiment
Magicexperiment moderator

@aartiana Thanks. We like putting out the more advanced material. It is needed, just as the basic material is as well.

Magicexperiment
Magicexperiment moderator

@Leni Thank you for writing for us! I really appreciate everyone one who has contributed and shared their voice through us. It's our privilege.

Magicexperiment
Magicexperiment moderator

@Lupa I'm glad that you were willing to publish some of your writing with Immanion Press and also for the other work you did over the years. All of its authors are what makes Immanion special in my eyes.